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Education Reporter
NUMBER 153 THE NEWSPAPER OF EDUCATION RIGHTS OCTOBER 1998
Education Briefs

Many courses offered at teachers' colleges focus on "diversity" and "oppression" rather than academics. In Massachussetts, where nearly 60% of prospective teachers failed a basic skills test last spring, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst lists the following courses for its education majors: "Social Diversity in Education," "Embracing Diversity," "Diversity & Change," "Introduction to Multicultural Education," "Oppression & Education," "Classism," "Racism," "Jewish Oppression," "Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual Oppression," "Oppression of the Disabled," and "Erroneous Beliefs."

A major new poll reports that more than 70% of black and white parents rate education as being more important than integration. The poll shows that parents of both races believe that, while integrated schools can help improve race relations, integration efforts sometimes cause teaching to suffer. A hefty 91% of black parents and 95% of white parents say they feel that mastery of the basics is "absolutely essential."

The concept of a "virtual, on-line university" is worrying professors in Washington state. Professors at the University of Washington sent an open letter to the Governor indicating their concern that his administration is too enthusiastic about computerized instruction via CD-ROM and the Internet. They noted that such courses are becoming a national trend, and cited a white paper issued by a financial services company that says computerized instruction "could easily substitute for campus-based instruction," and that software for as few as 25 courses could provide a core curriculum for about 80% of undergraduates.

Maryland is considering a plan to quadruple reading instruction requirements for elementary school teachers from three credit hours to 12. Middle and high school teachers would be required to take six credit hours. The state school board is expected to approve the plan despite formidable opposition from the NEA and higher education officials. Most teachers are applauding the proposed boost in standards and say they welcome the opportunity to increase their skills.

inside this issue . . .


Education Reporter is published monthly by Eagle Forum Education & Legal Defense Fund with editorial offices at 7800 Bonhomme Ave., St. Louis, MO 63105, (314) 721-1213. The views expressed in this newsletter are those of the persons quoted and should not be attributed to Eagle Forum Education & Legal Defense Fund. Annual subscription $25. Back issues available at $2.

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