Eagle Forum
Email
Subscribe
Shop
Shop
Youtube
Youtube
Blogger
Blog
Feeds
Feed
Back to Sept. Ed Reporter

Education Reporter
NUMBER 164 THE NEWSPAPER OF EDUCATION RIGHTS SEPTEMBER 1999

ACTing Better
Homeschool students score higher
than peers on college admissions test

Homeschoolers have another feather in their caps - they posted higher scores on the this year's American College Testing (ACT) national assessment exam than their peers in public and private schools.

The 1999 report issued by ACT administrators shows that homeschooled students scored an average of 22.7 out of a possible 36, tying them with high school students in Rhode Island, who ranked highest of teens in any state.

Michael Farris, president of the Home School Legal Defense Association, commenting on the test results in the August 18 Washington Times, said: "Once again, we can clearly and undeniably tell you that home schooling works. We're doing quite well as a movement. We should be rewarded with more freedom and not more regulation."

In recent years, some critics have charged that both the ACT and the SAT have been "dumbed down." Others claim that the tests have actually "gotten harder." Regardless, ACT data show that more students are taking the exam and that more colleges are using it as part of their admissions criteria.

Last spring, the results of a national study showed that homeschooled students perform much better on standardized tests than their peers. (See Education Reporter, May 1999.) They scored between the 75th and 85th percentile, compared to the national average, which is the 50th percentile.


 
Google Ads are provided by Google and are not selected or endorsed by Eagle Forum
Eagle Forum • PO Box 618 • Alton, IL 62002 phone: 618-462-5415 fax: 618-462-8909 eagle@eagleforum.org