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Education Reporter
NUMBER 280 THE NEWSPAPER OF EDUCATION RIGHTS MAY 2009

Education Briefs 
An influential government-appointed panel advised depression screening for all teens, even those with no symptoms of depression. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force wants doctors to use questionnaires to screen all American teenagers at least once a year. "You will miss a lot [of depression] if you only screen high-risk groups," said Dr. Ned Calonge, who chairs the task force. (Pediatrics, April 2009)

The U.S. Supreme Court heard a case concerning the constitutional rights of a 13-year-old girl whom school officials strip-searched after a classmate accused her of having ibuprofen at school. Ibuprofen is the painkiller commonly sold as Advil or Motrin. The girl, Savana Redding, was humiliated under Safford Middle School's bizarre zero-tolerance policy. (Washington Post, 4-11-09)

An insightful letter to the Wall Street Journal pointed out that the recession is not the only factor in families' saving or not saving for their children's college educations. "It is a fact that the current system of college tuition and financial aid formulas punishes good economic behavior," writes Kevin Poehlmann. Families with savings pay full tuition, while families who have not saved receive deep discounts. "Not only does this create a massive disincentive for savings on a national basis (why should you save if all the economic benefits get passed to the college and then on to the nonsavers in the form of lower tuition and grants), but it is fundamentally unfair and essentially a confiscatory tax." (Wall Street Journal, 4-7-09)

Brown University struck Columbus Day from the school calendar, and will celebrate "Fall Weekend" instead. Students and faculty will have the day off on Columbus Day, but without making reference to the explorer. The student newspaper found that two-thirds of students favored changing the holiday's name. (Fox News, 4-8-09)

Workers' poor English skills impact the economy to the tune of $65 billion a year in lost wages, according to a new report from the Lexington Institute. There are over 11 million people in the United States who do not speak English well, including more than 5 million who are in elementary or secondary school. "Americans who lack adequate English skills trail the rest of the nation substantially, both educationally and economically," the report finds. "Conditions such as linguistic isolation have exacerbated these challenges significantly, and the number of Americans living in linguistic isolation has grown in recent years."
(lexingtoninstitute.org/docs/845.pdf)

May 2009 Education Reporter
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Education Reporter is published monthly by Eagle Forum Education & Legal Defense Fund with editorial offices at 7800 Bonhomme Ave., St. Louis, MO 63105, (314) 721-1213. The views expressed in this newsletter are those of the persons quoted and should not be attributed to Eagle Forum Education & Legal Defense Fund. Annual subscription $25. Back issues available at $2.
 
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